PRESS

La Straniera with Teatro Nuovo

Opera News praises Steven LaBrie's "cantabile" and his "energized vocalism." Opera News by Judith Malafronte 

"Singing with great authority and with a real feel for bel canto ebb and flow, Steven LaBrie's chocolatey baritone was perfect for Valdeburgo. His contribution to the 15-minute Act I trio was highly distinguished, while his Act II aria won well-deserved applause." Musical America Worldwide

"As Valdeburgo, baritone Steven LaBrie practically stole the show every time he was onstage...once he gets a chance to unleash the voice in his upper range, it blossoms into a strikingly poignant bright timbre. This was best displayed in his double aria 'Si li Sciogliete, o giudici' where the baritone interpolated a number of high notes that had everyone in the audience in complete rapture. At the close of this aria, he won the most potent applause of the entire evening. The aria also featured the baritone with some incredibly polished legato phrasing, it added to the expansiveness of Bellini's melodies and furthered this sense of the character's nobility and rank.  He also put on similarly glorious display during the opera's first duet, 'lo la vidi' alongside soprano Alina Tamborini. 'Giovin rosa, il vergin seno' is one of the opera's first glorious melodies and the baritone delivered with a sense of delicacy and gentility.  Other interpreations might place a greater deal of emphatic authority on the line, but LaBrie's rendering made him a comforting companion to Isoletta.  It also established the baritone's gentle approach that would permeate his overall interpretation of the role and would be replicated in similarly tender passages with Alaide." OperaWire by David Salazar 

"Baritone Steven LaBrie proved a powerhouse as Valdeburgo (probably Bellini's biggest role for baritone)" Bachtrack by Robert Levine

"Steven LaBrie's baritone wielded stentorian authority as Valdeburgo, with rare agility in his bravura aria in the trial scene." Classical Voice North America by Susan Brodie

 

Concert with the Venetian Arts Society

"Steven possesses a full-bodied lyric baritone voice of unique and luscious beauty as well as ringing stentorian power. Add to this a solid bel canto technique, mesmerizing charisma, and an innate sense of style and drama and the result is breathtaking.  Throughout the evening Steven's multi-faceted artistry ran the gamut from finely tuned nuance to electrifying drama...all presented with a masterful technique.  Many times in the recital we caught glimpses of a true Verdi baritone in the making, reminiscent of a young Robert Merrill or Cornell MacNeil. This talented, handsome, and intelligent artist is truly the "entire package," a force of nature to be reckoned with... a dazzling new star in the rise!"  by William Riddle.

Three Decembers with San Diego Opera

"Steven LaBrie's robust, radiant baritone bowled me over after three notes and mesmerized me the rest of the evening.  A young singer with a longer list of awards than roles performed on the stage, I predict LaBrie will become a leading Verdi baritone in short order.  I hear in the richness of his voice -polished and magnificently unified from its profound depths to its ringing heights- a compelling Renato, Iago, or Count di Luna. And I trust General Director David Bennett has signed up LaBrie for many return visits to the company." San Diego Story  by Ken Herman.

"Baritone Steven LaBrie makes a thrilling company debut as Madeline's son Charlie.  LaBrie was a knockout, especially in his opening aria about Burt's diagnosis." San Diego Union-Tribune  by Pam Kragen.

The Elixir of Love with Opera Omaha

"Steven LaBrie sang the role of Belcore, the blustery high school bully. Rather than a soldier, he is a red leather clad gangster, trailed by a pack of incompetent cronies. Belcore is a bit of a poser who talks big but fails to follow through. LaBrie's rich, baritone voice made it hard to believe that Belcore was a high schooler, but perhaps he got held back a few years. The singer definitely sold the bad boy look onstage, looking physically threatening and brandishing a switchblade. However, LaBrie also managed to play up Belcore's oblivious buffoonery, showcasing the character's pompous mannerisms to great effect. Adina sees him for the fool he is, and Belcore is too egotistical to realize that she is just using him." Schmopera  by Meghan Klinkenborg

 

The Barber of Seville with Tulsa Opera

"The vocal fireworks begin early, with LaBrie's performance of 'Largo al factotum,' full of agile phrasing and an appealing swagger." Tulsa World  by James D. Watts Jr.

 

Recording: Tobias Greenhalgh, Steven LaBrie, Jarret Ott Remember, Roven Records

"The standout is Benjamin Boyle's Le passage des revês, a skillfull arrangement of four poems by Paul Valéry. Sung by LaBrie with an appealingly grainy tone and supple, eloquent delivery, the songs  trace the poet's shifting emotions during one romantic night. Opera News by Joanne Sydney Lessner

La Favorita with New Amsterdam Opera

"While Fernando is the leading role in the opera, it was baritone Steven LaBrie, in the role of Alfonso, that easily stole the show. From the moment La Brie entered the stage, he showcased a dominant presence that overpowered anyone on stage. He quickly captivated with his confident phrases in his aria 'Vien Leonora a'piede tuoi.' His voice, suave and ardent, moved about with flexibility as he shaped the lines with passion.  During his subsequent cabaletta, LaBrie gave his baritone a more heroic stance that demonstrated command of his instrument. It was vocal fireworks without superficial vocal pyrothecnics, such as interpolating unnecessary high notes.  But more potent was his Act Three aria, 'A Tanto amor.'  Here he sang with tenderness, caressing each phrase with a gorgeous piano that crescendoed to a forte.  His phrases grew in volume as the aria developed, showcasing the ardor and love for Leonora. It was easily the most beautiful moment of the evening and one that showed the varied colors this singer can give. But what also made LaBrie's performance standout was his stage presence."  Operawire by Francisco Salazar 

 

Concert for the new CD Release, Remember at Carnegie Hall

"LaBrie, easily objectifiable as he bursts pectorally out of his white button-down, sings with the kind of physicality and pressure that seems to run on eight pistons: his voice doesn't float so much as erupt. Either in the Benjamin Boyle series or Laitman's The Joy of Uncreating, LaBrie brought both electricity and brightly colored concern to the material Tuesday night. I especially liked his distraught take on the final Valéry poem, A l'aurore."  Parterre by Joel Rozen 

Florencia en el Amazonas with the Florida Grand Opera

"Lyric baritone Steven LaBrie stood out as the shamanic figure Riolobo, with a charisma on stage that matched his warm tone." Opera News  by Celeste Landeros

"Baritone Steven LaBrie handled the unique dual role of Riolobo, the ship's mate and a quasi-magical creature who functions as a narrator. During a rousing storm scene, when lightning and roiling black water appeared on the screen, LaBrie appeared high above stage as a brilliantly colored butterfly calming the winds.  This scene could have come off as hokey were it not for the brilliant lighting, the vibrant coloring of the butterfly - green, purple and blue- and LaBrie's imposing vocal and physical presence." So. Florida Classical Review by David Fleshler

"Steven LaBrie, a handsome Texas baritone with long dark braids and a runway charisma, makes his FGO debut. He delivers a Riolobo with a resonating captivating sound and crucially makes the dreamlike passages believable." Florida Theatre on Stage  by Bill Hirschman

"The river, certainly a character in this work, was embodied in the score as in Riolobo, the sturdy long haired baritone LaBrie making fine work at being the conduit between the real life on the boat and the fantastic element encountered along the otherwordly way.  Whether he was suggesting to Rosalba that she may find love, observing that the gleam of love had grown dim between Paula and Alvaro, or showing up with wings to implore the angry river to show mercy, his ample baritone was imbued with character." Miamiartzine   by Steve Gladstone

"The Texas baritone Steven LaBrie, as Riolobo, had perhaps the most powerful voice on stage Saturday night. It's a dark, cutting instrument that has what baritones in big character roles need. A tenor-like forcefulness and clarity with the resonance of a bass. He is in enviably good physical shape too, and muscled shirtlessness gave his character another bit of distance from the sailing urbanites in Edwardian getup." Palm Beach Arts Paper  by Greg Stepanich 

Carmen with the Sarasota Opera

"The role of Escamillo, the toreador, is a bit of a vocal dilemma. His one aria, the famous "Toreador Song" has an extended vocal range than can either seem too high or too low, depending on the singer, while the rest of the role is within normal boundaries. Baritone Steven LaBrie certainly has the swagger and look of the handsome and popular hero who steals Carmen's affections from her army corporal. His well-sung "Toreador Song" was definitely a crowd pleaser. Your Observer by Edward Alley

"Mr. LaBrie brought the stallion stance of a matador to life with his baritone dominance."  Broadway World  by Carolan Trbovich

Elijah with the San Antonio Symphony

"Baritone Steven LaBrie sang the title role of Elijah, performing in character, with confidence and forcefulness, asserting himself in the opening aria when Elijah announced a three-year drought for Israel.."  San Antonio Express-News  by David Hendricks

Le Nozze di Figaro with North Carolina Opera 

"Steven LaBrie's Count Almaviva had an endearing beffudlement at each new trick played on him, paired with an attractive warm baritone."  The News & Observer by Roy C. Dicks

"Count Almaviva was played by Steven LaBrie, another powerful and beautifully expressive baritone voice."  CVNC by Ken Hoover

"A vivid presence in recitative throughout the performance, the dramatic temperature soared whenever LaBrie was on stage." "The raw strength of the baritone's performance never overcame his unerring grasp of Mozart's style: his most ferocious anger was suave." "His performance of the alegro maestoso 'Vedro mentr'io sospiro, felice un servo mio' proved to be one of the afternoon's musical and dramatic peaks. Neither the trills nor the top F# troubled LaBrie." Voix des Arts by Joseph Newsome

Carmina Burana with the San Antonio Symphony

 

"All three soloists were flawless in their roles." "Baritone Steven LaBrie presented warmth and yearning in his Dies, nox et Omnia solo."  San Antonio Express-News by David Hendricks

 

 

Bard Music Festival's The Turandot Project Concert

 

"Among the strong casts for the two works, a standout was Steven LaBrie, whose sunny baritone proved equally handsome as Busoni's comic sidekick Barak and Puccini's scheming courtier Ping."  Observer by James Jorden

 

 

Pintscher's songs of Solomon's garden with the American Composers Orchestra at Carnegie Hall

 

"the vocal part, performed here with magisterial beauty by the baritone Steven LaBrie" The New York Times by Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim

 

"The impressively strong soloist, baritone Steven LaBrie, had completely internalized the flowing vocal line." New York Classical Review by Bruce Hodges

 

 

Rossini's Il barbiere di Siviglia at Lyric Opera Baltimore

 

"Steven LaBrie made a lithe, handsome Figaro, bringing out the character's uncommon mix of wit and grit with considerable ease. The baritone sang robustly, adding many a subtle nuance along the way." The Baltimore Sun by Tim Smith

 

 

George London Foundation Recital Series at the Morgan (Soloist)

 

"The Texas native possesses a voice of massive power and authority." "It was impossible not to admire the dark, coarse-grained timbre that brought rich color to all of his selections. He demonstrated superb dramatic sense and textual connection in the three Ballades de Francois Villon by Debussy" ... "the energy in his voice thrilling as he pushed through the end of the line, before dropping down into arresting pathos in the next." "The most unusual of LaBrie's ecletic program was a set of five Mexican ballads" "He approached these songs with wonderful, outsized passion" ... "His presence in Grever's Despedida was transfixing" New York Classical Review by Eric C. Simpson

 

 

Schubert's Die schöne Müllerin (The Wanderer) with Jessica Lang Dance at Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival (Soloist)

 

"The music sounded sublime." "LaBrie's voice sounded superb and it was amazing to watch how he easily sang this long solo part and moved gracefully among the professional dancers" Mass Live review by Ken Ross

 

"excellent" "gorgeous voice" The Boston Globe review by Janine Parker

 

 

Puccini's La bohème at Dallas' Opera (Schaunard)

 

"Steven LaBrie as Schaunard supplies a "well-appointed baritone" The Dallas Morning News review by Scott Cantrell

 

The "charismatic baritone Steven LaBrie as Schaunard" Dallas Observer review by Monica Hinman

 

Schaunard was "charmingly portrayed by baritone Steven LaBrie" The Dallas Voice review by Arnold Wayne Jones

 

 

Schubert's Die schöne Müllerin (The Wanderer) with Jessica Lang Dance at Brooklyn Academy of Music (Soloist)

 

"The robust baritone Steven LaBrie and the pianist Tyson Deaton rendered the score with compelling artistry." "The integration of Mr. LaBrie is equally excellent. Beginning on the balcony, he moves down -- at the perfect point, during the transitional song 'Pause" -- to sing among the dancers, heightening the intensity of his relation to them and the audience close by." "impassioned singing" The New York Times review by Brian Seibert

 

"Mr. LaBrie watched the goings-on with concern and interest, and moved with a casual grace that radiated humanity and thought (Singers, particularly operatic singers, often get a bad rap for their overstated or ungainly stage presence, but LaBrie's quiet intensity bellied this shopworn clichè.) His descent to the stage, where he circulated among the characters in his own story, gave the work the gravitas it had lacked up to that point." DanceTabs review by Marina Harss

 

 

Puccini's La bohème at Washington National Opera (Schaunard)

 

"It was certainly a democratic cast, in that all four bohemians seemed, for once, about equally matched, dramatically as well as vocally."  "Steven LaBrie complemented and evened the balance, as a strong Schaunard."Washington Post review by Anne Midgette

 

"Depicting Schaunard as a matinée idol with uninhibited high spirits, baritone Steven LaBrie was as light on his feet as Errol Flynn and more handsome than the young Cary Grant.  In his entrance in Act Four, clad like a cross-dressing Norma Desmond, Mr. LaBrie’s Schaunard stole the show, but it was his interaction with the other bohemians and the dying Mimì that proved unforgettable. Musically, every note that he sang was accurately-pitched and beautiful to hear, but Mr. LaBrie greatly enriched the performance by wearing Schaunard’s heart on his sleeve and making it obvious that the loss of Mimì was not solely Rodolfo’s tragedy." Voix Des Arts review by Joseph Newsome

 

"An even more colorful Steven LaBrie (Schaunard) added greatly to the performance." Baltimore Sun review by Tim Smith

 

 

Rossini's Le Comte Ory at Des Moines Metro Opera (Raimbaud)

 

"Steven LaBrie revealed a lyric baritone of lovely velvet as Raimbaud." Opera News review 

 

"Le Comte Ory is a silly puff of a show" - but the cast and crew stuff it with real talent."  Steven LaBrie's indelible comic portrayal of  Raimbaud, "one of the count's friends produces no fewer than 13 bottles from the folds of his disguise (a nun's habit). And there is much rejoicing."  The Des Moines Register review by Michael Morain

 

 

Puccini's La bohème at New Orleans Opera (Schaunard)

 

"Steven LaBrie played up Schaunard’s comic bits well, while singing boldly." The Times-Picayne review by Theodore P. Mahne

 

 

Menotti's The Consul at Seattle Opera (Secret Police Agent)

 

 "Steven LaBrie was suitably menacing as the agent of the Secret Police." His portrayal "was ingratiating in an oily manner instead of menacing... and thus both more effective and more chilling." Huffington Post review by Ivan Katz

 

"Steven LaBrie is all insinuating menace as the Secret Police Agent" The Seattle Times review by Melinda Bargreen

 

 

Licia Albanese-Puccini Concert Gala (Soloist)

 

"Steven LaBrie provided a "tour de force" with his "Drinking Song" from Ambroise Thomas' Hamlet. His vibrant, manly baritone and dazzling breath control captivated the audience. He was fearless and prepared to excite - and that he did!" Review by Nino Pantano

 

 

Bizet's Carmen at Dallas' Opera (Le Dancaïre)

 

"Baritone Steven LaBrie as Le Dancaïre and tenor William Ferguson as Remendado formed an engaging duo of smugglers and managed to pull the spotlight on those two characters" FrontRow D Magazine review by Wayne Lee Gay


"Secondary roles are splendidly cast," naming Mr. LaBrie, among others. Dallas Morning News review by Scott Cantrell

 

 

Rossini's Il viaggio a Reims at Wolf Trap Opera (Don Alvaro)

"A young baritone to watch, Steven LaBrie, singing in Rossini's Journey to Reims" Opera Now highlighting Wolf Trap Opera

 

 

Rossini's Il barbiere di Siviglia at the Academy of Vocal Arts (Figaro)

 

"Baritone Steven LaBrie reveled in his playing to the audience as Figaro the barber. He was ideal with his rich yet flexible voice, good looks and charismatic personality" The Opera Critic review by Steve Cohen

 

 

Handel's Tolomeo Opera at Glimmerglass Opera (Araspe)

 

"Steven LaBrie, from the Glimmerglass Young American Artists Program, was superb as Araspe" New York Times review by Steve Smith

 

"Araspe, ably performed by Glimmerglass Young American Artists Program member, Steven LaBrie, provides baritonal relief." ConcertoNet.com review by Michael Johnson

 

 

Puccini's La bohème at the Academy of Vocal Arts (Marcello)

 

"All of the cast displayed youthful fervor and sang at a level equal to or better than what we see in professional opera houses." "Steven LaBrie excelled dramatically and vocally." Review by Broad Street Review 

 

 

Opera Concert for the Marcello Giordani Foundation (Soloist)

 

"Steven LaBrie sang "Silvio's Aria" from Pagliacci with beauty of tone, ardor and a strong top. He possesses a truly impressive lyric baritone." Review by Nino PantanoSchubert's Die schöne Müllerin (The Wanderer) with Jessica Lang Dance at Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival (Soloi

 

"The music sounded sublime." "LaBrie's voice sounded superb and it was amazing to watch how he easily sang this long solo part and moved gracefully among the professional dancers" Mass Live review by Ken Ross

 

"excellent" "gorgeous voice" The Boston Globe review by Janine Parker

 

 

Puccini's La bohème at Dallas' Opera (Schaunard)

 

"Steven LaBrie as Schaunard supplies a "well-appointed baritone" The Dallas Morning News review by Scott Cantrell

 

The "charismatic baritone Steven LaBrie as Schaunard" Dallas Observer review by Monica Hinman

 

Schaunard was "charmingly portrayed by baritone Steven LaBrie" The Dallas Voice review by Arnold Wayne Jones

 

 

Schubert's Die schöne Müllerin (The Wanderer) with Jessica Lang Dance at Brooklyn Academy of Music (Soloist)

 

"The robust baritone Steven LaBrie and the pianist Tyson Deaton rendered the score with compelling artistry." "The integration of Mr. LaBrie is equally excellent. Beginning on the balcony, he moves down -- at the perfect point, during the transitional song 'Pause" -- to sing among the dancers, heightening the intensity of his relation to them and the audience close by." "impassioned singing" The New York Times review by Brian Seibert

 

"Mr. LaBrie watched the goings-on with concern and interest, and moved with a casual grace that radiated humanity and thought (Singers, particularly operatic singers, often get a bad rap for their overstated or ungainly stage presence, but LaBrie's quiet intensity bellied this shopworn clichè.) His descent to the stage, where he circulated among the characters in his own story, gave the work the gravitas it had lacked up to that point." DanceTabs review by Marina Harss

 

 

Puccini's La bohème at Washington National Opera (Schaunard)

 

"It was certainly a democratic cast, in that all four bohemians seemed, for once, about equally matched, dramatically as well as vocally."  "Steven LaBrie complemented and evened the balance, as a strong Schaunard."Washington Post review by Anne Midgette

 

"Depicting Schaunard as a matinée idol with uninhibited high spirits, baritone Steven LaBrie was as light on his feet as Errol Flynn and more handsome than the young Cary Grant.  In his entrance in Act Four, clad like a cross-dressing Norma Desmond, Mr. LaBrie’s Schaunard stole the show, but it was his interaction with the other bohemians and the dying Mimì that proved unforgettable. Musically, every note that he sang was accurately-pitched and beautiful to hear, but Mr. LaBrie greatly enriched the performance by wearing Schaunard’s heart on his sleeve and making it obvious that the loss of Mimì was not solely Rodolfo’s tragedy." Voix Des Arts review by Joseph Newsome

 

"An even more colorful Steven LaBrie (Schaunard) added greatly to the performance." Baltimore Sun review by Tim Smith

 

 

Rossini's Le Comte Ory at Des Moines Metro Opera (Raimbaud)

 

"Steven LaBrie revealed a lyric baritone of lovely velvet as Raimbaud." Opera News review 

 

"Le Comte Ory is a silly puff of a show" - but the cast and crew stuff it with real talent."  Steven LaBrie's indelible comic portrayal of  Raimbaud, "one of the count's friends produces no fewer than 13 bottles from the folds of his disguise (a nun's habit). And there is much rejoicing."  The Des Moines Register review by Michael Morain

 

 

Puccini's La bohème at New Orleans Opera (Schaunard)

 

"Steven LaBrie played up Schaunard’s comic bits well, while singing boldly." The Times-Picayne review by Theodore P. Mahne

 

 

Menotti's The Consul at Seattle Opera (Secret Police Agent)

 

 "Steven LaBrie was suitably menacing as the agent of the Secret Police." His portrayal "was ingratiating in an oily manner instead of menacing... and thus both more effective and more chilling." Huffington Post review by Ivan Katz

 

"Steven LaBrie is all insinuating menace as the Secret Police Agent" The Seattle Times review by Melinda Bargreen

 

 

Licia Albanese-Puccini Concert Gala (Soloist)

 

"Steven LaBrie provided a "tour de force" with his "Drinking Song" from Ambroise Thomas' Hamlet. His vibrant, manly baritone and dazzling breath control captivated the audience. He was fearless and prepared to excite - and that he did!" Review by Nino Pantano

 

 

Bizet's Carmen at Dallas' Opera (Le Dancaïre)

 

"Baritone Steven LaBrie as Le Dancaïre and tenor William Ferguson as Remendado formed an engaging duo of smugglers and managed to pull the spotlight on those two characters" FrontRow D Magazine review by Wayne Lee Gay


"Secondary roles are splendidly cast," naming Mr. LaBrie, among others. Dallas Morning News review by Scott Cantrell

 

 

Rossini's Il viaggio a Reims at Wolf Trap Opera (Don Alvaro)

"A young baritone to watch, Steven LaBrie, singing in Rossini's Journey to Reims" Opera Now highlighting Wolf Trap Opera

 

 

Rossini's Il barbiere di Siviglia at the Academy of Vocal Arts (Figaro)

 

"Baritone Steven LaBrie reveled in his playing to the audience as Figaro the barber. He was ideal with his rich yet flexible voice, good looks and charismatic personality" The Opera Critic review by Steve Cohen

 

 

Handel's Tolomeo Opera at Glimmerglass Opera (Araspe)

 

"Steven LaBrie, from the Glimmerglass Young American Artists Program, was superb as Araspe" New York Times review by Steve Smith

 

"Araspe, ably performed by Glimmerglass Young American Artists Program member, Steven LaBrie, provides baritonal relief." ConcertoNet.com review by Michael Johnson

 

 

Puccini's La bohème at the Academy of Vocal Arts (Marcello)

 

"All of the cast displayed youthful fervor and sang at a level equal to or better than what we see in professional opera houses." "Steven LaBrie excelled dramatically and vocally." Review by Broad Street Review 

 

 

Opera Concert for the Marcello Giordani Foundation (Soloist)

 

"Steven LaBrie sang "Silvio's Aria" from Pagliacci with beauty of tone, ardor and a strong top. He possesses a truly impressive lyric baritone." Review by Nino Pantano

Copyright - Steven LaBrie 2020